Leonardo's Last Supper
Milan
(5968)

Leonardo's Last Supper, best tours and attractions

The survival of Leonardo’s masterpiece is almost as amazing as its vision. It was already being ‘restored’ in 1726, with an ill-advised application of...

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Guided Tour

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Available in: English
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Good to know

All tickets must be booked in advance (they're released four months ahead of time). If you missed out your best chance is to arrive before the first appointment (8.15am) in case there's been a cancellation.
Little remains of the original painting, which started to deteriorate soon after its completion. Da Vinci had experimented with a new method of painting on dry plaster (instead of wet), which was less durable but allowed for greater detail and luminosity.
Da Vinci lived in nearby Casa degli Atellani during the painting of his masterpiece and was given a vineyard on the same grounds. Today you can tour his vineyard, recreated with the help of wine geneticists.
Jesus originally had feet but this portion of the painting was demolished when they added a door to the refectory in 1650.
It was almost destroyed several times, by flood, Allied bombing in WWII, Napoleon's troops who used the room as a stable, and even well-meaning restorers in the 19th century.
Your visit will be short (15 minutes) but you'll have the space to really appreciate the artwork as only 25 people are allowed in at one time.
It took three years to finish. When the prior of the monastery complained about how long it was taking, it's said that Da Vinci responded by threatening to use the prior's face as the model for Judas.
It's famed for its unique perspective. Reputedly Da Vinci hammered a nail into the wall and attached string in orthogonal lines to create this effect.
The Holy Trinity is emphasized through the repetition of the number three. The apostles are grouped in threes, there are three windows in the background and the form of Jesus resembles the three points of a triangle.
Countless copies have been made of this famous art work along with contemporary reinterpretations by Salvador Dalí and Andy Warhol.

The inside story

The survival of Leonardo’s masterpiece is almost as amazing as its vision. It was already being ‘restored’ in 1726, with an ill-advised application of caustic solvents and varnish. In 1770, Giusseppe Mazza repainted much of the original in oil. In 1853, Stefano Barezzi tried to detach the painting from the wall but failed and instead glued the paint fragments to the base.

Only in 1903 was it discovered that the painting was done in tempera, not oil, and its surface was cleaned accordingly. A bomb nearly destroyed the refectory in 1943, but the work was successfully cleaned of mildew and lightened in 1947.

Modern restoration showed that the historical over-painting was eating the original and causing it to flake. The decision was therefore made to remove everything added to the mural since it was completed in 1498 – an extremely time-consuming microscopic task using advanced technology. Today, the painting is preserved by an air-filtration system, a monitored environment, and dust-filtering technology. Visitors are limited to 25 people for 15 minutes each time.

Opening times

  • 8.15am-6.45pm – Tuesday to Sunday
  • CLOSED: Mondays and public holidays 1 January, 1 May, 25 December

About The Last Supper

Duke Ludovico Sforza of Milan was behind the creation of Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece The Last Supper. The Duke had adopted Santa Maria delle Grazie as his court church and wanted to decorate it in a manner that reflected his wealth and power. This meant a great painting by a great artist.

Leonardo began work in 1495 on the northern wall of the refectory and completed the painting three years later, the complete image measuring 4.5x8.8m (15x29ft). Contrary to popular belief, it was not a fresco, which required fast and decisive work before the wet plaster dried. Leonardo liked to take his time and change his mind, so he designed a new kind of application using tempera (an egg-based paint).

Alas, the great genius Leonardo made a mistake this time. His base for the painting included pitch and mastic, which did not bond the pigment as well or as permanently as he had hoped. The aesthetic considerations, however, were sublime. Leonardo created his amazing illusions of perspective using a nail in the wall and strings radiating from it to ensure that all would be correct

The subject was a common one in churches, but Leonardo’s innovation was to create a sense of drama and movement by portraying the exact moment when Jesus announced that one of his disciples would betray him. What we see is a radiating wave of shocked reaction. He also chose to portray all attendees in a straight line so that each could receive due attention.

It’s said that the faces in the work are based on real people known to the artist. Judas may have been a real-life local prisoner or criminal and, here, Leonardo puts him among the others rather than separate (as traditional dictated). Judas is the only one who seems not to be outraged or surprised.

Address

Piazza Santa Maria delle Grazie 2, Milan

Getting there

  • By Metro: Line 2: Conciliazione
  • By tram: Line 16: S Maria delle Grazia
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How to get there

Leonardo's Last Supper Milan Milan
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